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LIVES OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE
The E.J. Boys Archive

Added 25th July 2012. New Charge account added 29.9.18.

IN PROGRESS — NOT FOR PUBLICATION

Painting by Charlton of Captain Morgan at the Russian Guns

Captain Godfrey Charles MORGAN (later 1st Viscount Tredegar) — 17th Lancers

ACCOUNTS OF THE BALACLAVA CHARGE

Letter from Godfrey Morgan to his father, dated 27th October 1854, published in the Cardiff and Merthyr Guardian, 17th of November 1854. (Original at http://newspapers.library.wales/view/3090911/3090914/28/.). A letter from William Garland, also dated 27th October, was published at the same time.


(Click on image to enlarge)

[PB: Check against the above. The version below is, I believe, Anthony Dawson's transcript, Letters, pp.137-8.]

Letter from Captain William [? Godfrey] Morgan, 17th Lancers, to his father.

Balaklava,

My dear Father — Oct. 27, 1854.

As usual, I am hard pressed to save the post, as, being always in momentary expectation of being turned out, it is just as much as we have time to do to get our horses fed and watered, and eat our rapid meals.

I am at present commanding officer of the 17th Lancers, which gallant little regiment now consists of fifty men and horses fit for duty, and three officers.

I fear that before you receive this letter you will have heard some bad news of the cavalry light brigade. However, not to keep you in suspense, I will begin by saying that I am safe and well in my own person, having come out from that gallant, brilliant (but, as all add, useless) charge under a tremendous fire of all arms from front and flanks, and a perfect forest of swords and lances, untouched, with only a sabre cut on poor old Sir Briggs (my charger) head just over the right eye.

On the 25th, about half-past five a.m., when about to file in from our usual morning parade, we heard the report and saw the smoke of a gun from a Turkish redoubt, and soon perceived the Russians advancing, supported by heavy artillery, in number believed to be about 20,000 infantry and 3,000 cavalry.

At the first sight of them the Turks 'cut and run', forsaking their guns, and the Russians quickly brought their horse-artillery upon the heights. We retired out of range. Down came huge masses of cavalry upon us. The Greys and Enniskillens charged, and broke through them. The 4th and 5th Dragoon

Guards struck in; the Russians turned and fled right and left, and retreating over the hill, took up a tremendously strong position in the valley. We waited about two hours for some infantry to come to our support, when an order arrived (as we must believe, by mistake) for the Light Brigade to charge the enemy's position.

On we went — astonished, but unshaken in nerve over half a mile of rough ground, losing dozens of men and horses at every stride, to attack horse artillery in our front, supported by three times our l numbers of cavalry, heavy batteries on our right and left flanks, backed by l infantry, riflemen Ste. We took the guns, cut up the gunners, routed the cavalry, and amid a storm of shot, found ourselves very soon surrounded on all sides by the enemy, through whom all that remained of us cut our way back to l our position.

We went into action 140 strong. I numbered the regiment off 34, when we returned. The other regiments suffered nearly as much.

[PB: Extracts appeared in e.g. Hertford Mercury and Reformer, Saturday 25 November 1854]

Letter from Godfrey Morgan to his father, dated 31st October 1854, published in the Monmouthshire Merlin, 1st of December 1854, p.5:

LETTER PROM CAPTAIN GODFREY MORGAN.

Balaklava, October 31st, 1854.

MY DEAR FATHER,

As I am now on outlying picket, with my videttes and the Cossacks staring each other in the face, a bitter cold frosty day, with a north-east wind, I shall take the opportunity of giving you rather a minute account of the cavalry action in front of Balaklava, on the 25th.

There is a sloping plains in front of the village, at the end of which, at the distance of about a mile, there are a succession of redoubts, made out of natural hillocks, which run right across it, into which detachments of Turks had been placed, with guns from one of our men of war. The cavalry were encamped about half way up the plain, on left, from Balaklava. The enemy had several times made attempts to attack our position, but had always retired after a few shots. However, on the night of the 24th, being in great force, they managed to get some guns into position, and at about half-past five in the morning, when we sitting, shivering and shaking, on our usual morning parade, began hammering away at the big redoubt on the right, at the same time pushing forward columns of infantry to attack it — it being the most unsupported.

We had only one English regiment on the field, the 93rd Highlanders, which were drawn up in line, in front of the entrance to Balaklava. The Turks fired a few shots from the redoubt, but were evidently in a fright — and, from the badness of their firing, I began to fancy that all was not right.

All this time we were formed in different, detached bodies, in rear of the different redoubts, and, consequently, when the Russian guns had a little too much elevation, or too much powder, the shot and shell kept bursting about us, every now and then dropping man and horse. Their firing, in general, was very good, and in the course of a quarter of an hour or so, they had managed to wound Maude, (the captain,) and kill eight or nine horses, as they stood in the limbers. All this time I was intently watching the redoubt on the right, from which I heard musketry, and I then I saw their skirmishers gradually retire up the hill, and, oh, horror! the Russians after them, driving them before them like sheep. The remainder of the Turks that were in the redoubt, then fired a few shots, and bolted down the other side of the hill, like blazes. We heard a horrid cheer, and the Russians had gained the redoubt, and with two of our 32-pounders. I could have cried.

The enemy had soon a field battery up there, which commenced opening upon the cavalry, and compelled them to retire slowly out of range, which we did, leaving the 93rd apparently unsupported. The enemy seeing this, then took courage, and sent down a huge body of cavalry. We saw all sitting still, our swords tightly grasped in our hands, and our spurs at our horses' sides, burning to be let loose upon them but the order came not, and it was, perhaps, as well that it did not, as the 93rd received their charge in line, and caused them, by a couple of volleys, to turn and run away at their best pace.

Our attention was then attracted to another large mass of cavalry coming over the rise, and apparently making straight for us; the heavy Brigade was detached to tackle them. The Scots Greys and Enniskillens were the first let at them — but, being in a bad piece of ground, they could not go any pace, but jogged up to them, and literally hewed their way through a body three times their number. In a moment the flanks wheeled up and enclosed them, but the 4th Dragoon Guards coming down opportunely, they all turned about, and galloped up the hill a good deal faster than they came.

The Light Brigade, at that time, in my opinion, was in a position from which, by a dashing manoeuvre from the right, we might have come down upon them in their retreat, and cut them off to a man but the opportunity was missed, and very galling it was to all of us.

After this, cavalry and infantry retired to nearly where they came from, with the exception of two redoubts on which they rested [?] their left, and took up a very strong position across a valley, with batteries on the hills on either side and columns of infantry, and about three thousand cavalry in support — some on the left, and some in the rear of the guns.

We, the Light Brigade, were drawn up at the other end of the valley, facing their position, distant about three quarters of a mile, waiting, I had imagined, for infantry to come to our support, when suddenly an aide-de-camp (poor Nolan,) galloped up, with an order, — "The Light Brigade will attack; the 17th and 13th will advance, supported by the 4th and 16th." [PB: presumably a compositor's error for 11th. What about the 8th? Add the actual text here.]

Knowing the strength of their position, and our want of proper support, I felt it was a critical moment, but, grasping our horses by the head, away we went.

We had not gone many yards before we were under fire of the first heavy battery, on our left — the first shot from which killed poor Nolan, a splinter going right through his heart, and his horse carried him back through us. He was a dashing fellow, and, with a smile on his face, was riding about twenty yards in front of us. On we went, the pace increasing, amidst the thickest shower of shell, shot, grape, canister, and minie, from front and flanks — horses and men dropping by scores every yard. The whirling and cracking of shells was beyond all description.

Under this we went for three quarters of a mile — the enemy's guns firing in front of us till we were within a yard and a half of them.

Just as I came close to one, it went off, and, naturally, round went my horse; I turned him round, and put him at it again, and got through; on we went, and passed the guns, and saw the cavalry retreating the other side. and the same number of the 13th were to be seen so we turned to come back, knowing we could not hold the guns we had taken. The 8th, 4th, and 11th, followed us in, and suffered nearly as much as ourselves.

We saw the enemy between us and home, and at them we went. I cut down one fellow as he ran one of my fellows through with a lance, and, digging my spurs in my horse's sides, he went at it as he has often gone at the big fences in Monmouthshire. I got through them with only a few lance pokes, which I managed to parry; but the number of men had diminished. We had to retire through a shower of Minie bullets, and we reformed in rear of the Heavy Brigade.

I numbered off 32 men [PB: another letter says 34]. We went into action 145 strong in the morning. The 13th lost more and the other three about half their number. Our mess was sadly shortened — of seven, only two remained sound; one was killed — the others wounded. The worst of the whole thing was, that the enemy still retained possession of the ground, and they are now forming entrenchments. Much mistaken if they think we are going to attack them. We are now moved up to the heights above Sebastopol. Storming is expected daily. I am afraid there will be slaughter.

Dear old Fred is very flourishing; he saw the charge, and you may imagine his anxiety. The Light Brigade now form one good sized regiment. I enclose you the order, that came out after our charge — it is flattering, it is not? [PB: presumably compositor's error for "is it not?"]

Love to dearest Mother, Sisters, and Brothers. Hoping this affair will soon be terminated, that I may get a chance of seeing you all again soon, believe me,

Ever your most attached son,

GODFREY MORGAN.

P.S. — There is a tremendous cannonading going on at Sebastopol. - I am now commanding officer.

[Source: Monmouthshire Merlin, 1st of December 1854, p.5 (accessed 24.7.2015)]

The journey out

"I have a great admiration for American sailors and the American people generally. When the Crimean War broke out, in the summer of 1854, the first soldiers sent out of England were the cavalry regiments, and I went with them.

At that time England had been at peace for 40 years, and when war commenced the authorities knew little about the transport of cavalry. We did not go out as a whole regiment in a large liner, and arrive at our destination without the loss of a horse, as would be the case now.

We were sent out in troops of 40 or 50 at a time, in small sailing vessels of 500 tons. In the ship in which I sailed the horses were packed in the hold, and when they got to the Bay of Biscay a violent gale sprang up. In a few hours half a dozen horses broke loose and struggled about in the hold.

There was only one American sailor among the crew, and he went down and "calculated" and uttered dreadful oaths. But he had not been down in the hold half an hour before he had all the horses tied up again. Ever since then I have had the greatest respect for Emerican sailors.

Cardiff Eisteddfod,

August 4th, 1902."

[Source?]

Was the "Charge" sounded at Balaclava?

"To the best of my belief here was no trumpet charge sounded at Balaclava, and I will state my reason. We were Lancers — the 17th Lancers — one of the greatest regiments of the British cavalry, and when a lancer is walking, standing still, trotting or cantering, he carries his lance in a rest, upright, in a little bucket which is fixed to his stirrup. He will go everywhere like that, and he will only bring his lance down to charge.

Well, the Lancers had cantered up to within 300 or 400 yards of the guns, when Major White hallooed out, "Charge, there."

The Lancers came down to the proper position, Lord Cardigan then hallooed across to him, "You have no word to charge." I was close up and heard it; but as you might well imagine, before it has taken me the time to tell it the Lancers were amongst the guns, and there was no time to sound the trumpets at all...

My version, therefore, is that there was no trumpet charge sounded at Balaclava at all. The controversy arose from the fact that a trumpet was put up for sale in London which was said to be the actual trumpet which sounded the charge. I believe it was very silly when I did it, but I sent a commissioner with instructions to go as high as 20 for the trumpet, but some-one a great deal sillier than I gave 700 for it. Whether it was the right one or not, I am not inclined to say."

["Viscount Tredegar: His Life and Work"]

The Charge at Balaclava

"I do not remember ... hearing a word from anybody as we gradually broke from a trot into a canter, though the noise of the striking of men and horses by the grape-shot was deafening, whilst the dust and gravel thrown up by the round-shot that fell short was almost blinding, and so irritated my horse that I could scarcely hold him at all. But as we came nearer, I could see plainly enough, especially when I was about one hundred yards from the guns and I distinctly saw the gunner apply his fuse. I shut my eyes then, for I thought that question was settled as far as I was concerned, but the shot missed me and struck the man on my right full in the chest.

In another minute I was on the gun, and the leading Russian's grey horse — shot, I suppose, with a pistol, by somebody on my right, — fell across my horse, dragging it over with him and pinning me between the gun and himself.

A Russian gunner on foot at once covered me with his carbine, he was just within easy reach of my sword, and I struck him across the neck. The blow did not do him much harm, but it disconcerted his aim. At the same time a mounted gunner struck my horse across the forehead with his sabre. Spurring Sir Briggs, he half-jumped, half-blundered over the fallen horse, and then for a short time bolted with me. I only remember myself alone amongst the Russians, trying to get out as best I could. This, by some chance I did, in spite of the attempts of the Russians to cut me down...

'When I was back pretty well where we started from I found that I was the senior officer who was not wounded, and consequently, in command."

[Obituary in the Cardiff Times and South Wales Weekly News, 13th of March 1913]

A letter home on the night after the battle

[PB: This article includes a substantial excerpt from the letter dated 31st October 1854, published in the Monmouthshire Merlin (above).]

Addressed to 'My dear father', the letter starts by saying it is being written "on outlying picket, with my vedettes and the Cossacks staring each other in the face, a bitter, cold, frosty day, with a north-east wind."

He outlines the events of the day, and expresses the bitter humiliation that he felt on seeing the Russians capture a redoubt (at which he says, "I could have cried"), and describes the relative positions of the Light Cavalry and the rest of the Allied troops and the Russians.

They were about a mile away from the guns when "poor Nolan" galloped up with the fatal order.

"Knowing the strength of their position and our own want of support, I felt it was a critical moment, but grasping our horses by the head, away we went.

We had not gone many yards before we were under fire from the first heavy battery (on our left) the first shot from which killed poor Nolan, a splinter going right through his heart. He was a dashing fellow, and with a smile on his face, was riding about twenty yards in front of us. On we went, the pace increasing, amidst the thickest shower of shell, shot, grape, canister, and minie, from front and flanks, horses and men dropping in scores every yard...

Under this we went for some three-quarters of a mile, the enemy's guns firing in front of us until we were within a yard and a half of them. Just as I was close to one it went off, and naturally round went my horse. I turned him around and put him at it again, and got through. On we went and passed the guns, and saw cavalry retreating on the other side. No more than a dozen of the 17th and about the same number of the 13th were to be seen, so we turned back, knowing that we could not hold the guns we had taken...

We saw the enemy between us and home, so at them we went. I struck at one fellow as he ran one of my men through with his lance, and digging my spurs into his sides, he went at it as he had often gone at the big fences in Monmouthshire. I got through them with only a few lance pokes, which I was able to parry, but the number of men had diminished...

I numbered off 32 men. We had gone into action 145 strong that morning... Our mess, too, was sadly shortened. Of seven, only two remained sound; one was killed, and the others wounded. The worst thing was that the enemy still remained in the possession of the ground... We are now moving to the heights above Sebastopol. Storming is expected daily. I am afraid there will be slaughter...

Dear old Fred [his brother] is very flourishing. He saw the charge and you may well imagine his anxiety... I enclose you the order which came out after our charge. Very flattering, is it not. Love to dearest mother and sisters and brothers. Hoping this affair will soon be terminated, so that I may have the chance of seeing you all once again. Believe me, your ever most attached son.

Godfrey Morgan.

P.S. There is a tremendous amount of cannonading going on at Sebastopol. I am now the commanding officer."

[Obituary in the Cardiff Times and South Wales Weekly News, 13th of March 1913]

"All that was left of them..."

"It may interest my audience to know what I was doing this time of day fifty years ago. I was numbering off all that was left of them and it was a very sad duty; comrades were lying about who wanted to whisper into one's ear last words to someone or other — some girl, mother, sister or daughter while the breath of life was passing away; and when one knelt down to them, all he got as their life's blood spurted about him."

From a speech at the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Balaclava at the Willis Rooms at St James

[Greeves, p61, after Harris, 1908]

My own courage was small

"My own courage in the memorable charge was small, but the deed of daring conferred everlasting credit on the Senior Officers who took part in it. I trust that you will keep your offspring fully acquainted with the heroic deeds of the British Army, and induce them to display similar courage in the hour of their country's danger.

Balaclava Dinner, Castleton,

October 25th, 1890."

[Source? ]

I consider myself one of the most fortunate men in England

"I consider myself one of the most fortunate men in England to have been one of those spared out of the 600 about whom so much has been said and sung. Although my military career has been brief, I have seen a great deal. I have seen war in all its horrors. It is said to be "an ill wind that blows nobody good"; so it has been with me. I have learned to doubly appreciate home and all its comforts.

Before going out to the Crimea I was accustomed to see, on these occasions, farmers looking happy and contented, and I was in the habit of thinking what a great nation England was, and how she flourished in all things; but since the war commenced I have seen the other side of the picture.

I have seen an army march into an hostile country, and in the midst of farms flowing with milk and honey, and teeming with corn and every luxury — and there, in a few hours, all was desolation, one stone not being left on another, and the people made slaves to the invaders. How thankful we ought to be that we are not suffering at the hand of an invading army.

Now that my military career is at an end I am sure that a great many of you will sympathise with my father, whose anxiety has been very great. We were out during the most dreadful period of the war, and it need not be wondered at that I yielded to the most earnest entreaties of my father to relinquish my connection with the army lest I should bring his grey hairs with sorrow to the grave. My father thought that one such action as I have been in was sufficient to prove the mettle of his son.

I will not further enlarge on the horrors and miseries of war. May you never see them as I have done, and may we all meet at this festive board next year.

Newport Agricultural Show,

December 18th, 1855."

[Source?]

I hope the British nation will never forget

"I do not intend to say much about Balaclava today because you have heard the old story over and over again, and I am too old now to invent stories of Balaclava.

On my way down here I stopped to receive a telegram worded in these terms: — "Fifteen survivors of the Balaclava Charge send your lordship hearty congratulations and affectionate remembrances on this day, the 54th anniversary." Well, recollections of a sad event are at any time, of course, unpleasant, but it is particularly sad to think that there are now only 15 survivors remaining out of the Light Brigade of 600. That attenuated number does not include myself, and there are three other officers still alive.

You may be pretty confident that of these few survivors there were at least two or three with whom I conversed within a few hours of the Balaclava Charge. You can imagine those conversations. They were not very lively ones. They referred probably to some comrade who had been killed or to the difficulty of filling the place of some officer who had fallen; because when we drew up after the Balaclava Charge I was the officer in command of the decimated regiment. All my superior officers had been either killed or wounded, and I was placed in the difficult position to find men suddenly to fill the vacancies.

So you can imagine the recollections of those survivors. Since that time there have been a number of gallant deeds on the part of the British army, and I hope that those gallant deeds will be remembered, just as the Balaclava Charge is remembered here. I hope the British nation will never forget such events as Trafalgar and Waterloo, but will always hoist a flag or do something else to commemorate them.

Balaclava Dinner, Bassaleg,

October 25th, 1908."

[Source?]

The term "hero"

"When a person gets beyond the allotted age of man there must, I think, be in his mind a melancholy thought regarding the possibility of his being present on a similar occasion twelve months hence. I am afraid that some men of my age would have to limp into a room, probably assisted by a crutch. Fortunately, however, I was able to walk into the room without a crutch and without assistance, and I am thankful for that to the Power above. The term "hero" is a term with which many soldiers do not agree. The mention of the word recalls to my mind the well-known lines of Rudyard Kipling:

"We aren't no thin red 'eroes, An' we aren't no blackguards, too, But single men in barracks, Most remarkable like you."

I am sure the soldiers who fought with the Light Cavalry at Balaclava did not think themselves greater heroes than others in the Crimea who did their duty. Quite recently I read an article in a military magazine, it dealt with the question of the advance of cavalry and the arms which should be given them — the lance, the sword, and the rifle.

The article commenced with the statement that it was the business of every soldier to go into action with the determination to try and kill someone. I suppose that is right in its way, but it was hardly the sentiment we went into action with. We went into action to try to defeat the enemy, but the fewer we killed the better. I have to confess that I tried to kill someone, but to this day I congratulate myself on the fact that I do not know whether I succeeded or no.

In these days of long range guns our consciences are saved a great deal, and so far as killing anyone goes I always give myself the benefit of the doubt, so that the charge of murder cannot be brought against me.

Balaclava Dinner, Bassaleg,

October 29th, 1910."


On the occasion of the presentation of a Portrait of his Lordship's Statue in Cathays Park, Cardiff, September 19th, 1909."

"The commander of the French Army said of the Balaclava Charge that it was magnificent, but that it was not war. I do not know what the French general called war, but my recollection of the charge is that it was something very nearly like it. I have to thank the Power above for being here now, fifty-five years after the charge took place. Whether this statue will commemorate me for a long time or not is of little moment, but I know it will commemorate for ever the sculptor, Mr. Goscombe John. Unveiling of equestrian statue of Viscount Tredegar in Cathays Park, Cardiff, on 55th Anniversary of the Balaclava Charge, October 25th, 1909."

[Source? ]

Captain Godfrey Morgan's account of "The Charge" [1897]

by Dr Douglas J Austin

The following factual account appeared in the Flintshire Observer Mining Journal and General Advertiser for the Counties of Flint, Denbigh, 4th November 1897

THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE. LORD TREDEGAR INTERVIEWED.

Lord Tredegar - the Capt. Godfrey Morgan who found himself in charge of the 17th Lancers at Balaclava when all his senior officers were either killed or wounded in the famous charge of the Light Brigade - has been induced by the Western Mail to describe what he did and saw on that memorable day. His Lordship's narrative is as follows:- "My first recollection on the eventful morning of October 25, 1854, was turning out before dawn very cold and uncomfortable, but soon after forming up in front of our camp unusual movements were observed in the redoubts held by the Turks on the rising ground on our left front, and it was not long before we felt that something out of the common was going to happen on that side of Balaclava.

We had not long to wait, as we saw shots striking the redoubts from an invisible enemy the other side of the hill. Soon after this the lances of the Cossacks or other Russian cavalry appeared over the brow, surrounding the redoubts, out of which the Turks came running, leaving them in the possession of the Russians.

I then saw the Highlanders forming into line in front of Balaclava, and almost immediately they were attacked, but they stood their ground, and the Russians did not get very near. At the same time a large body of Russian cavalry came down the hill at the charge, and the heavy cavalry brigade formed at once into line and advanced to meet them. It was a curious sight. They had hardly time to get up a trot when they met the Russians coming down hill. There was a kind of a shock as they met, and then the heavens appeared through them. A hand-to-hand fight continued, and then the Russians turned and galloped back.

At that moment Capt. Morris, who was in command of the 17th Lancers, said, or shouted: "Now is our chance!" and then he suggested, I think to Lord Cardigan, our chief who was just in front of us, that "we ought to follow up the success and complete the rout." He was told it was not his business, or words to that effect. Capt. Morris then turned to the 17th and said "The 17th shall do it themselves. 17th Lancers, advance!" We advanced about 100 yards, when Lord Cardigan galloped up and ordered us back into line. We were shortly afterwards moved up over the hill, and formed up at the head of the valley. When we got there we saw the army, which we afterwards knew was that of Liprandi's masses, at the head of the valley and on its hills to right and left. Some of them were at the redoubts vacated by the Turks.

About 11 o'clock an order came to Lord Lucan to prevent the enemy carrying off the guns. While standing in position I remarked to poor Webb: "We are in range of them now from that battery on our left." At that moment we were ordered to advance, and a puff of smoke from the battery alluded to told me that the Russians thought as I did. The first shell burst in the air about 100 yards in front of us. The next one dropped in front of Nolan's horse and exploded on touching the ground. He uttered a wild yell as his horse turned round, and, with his arms extended, the reins dropped on the animal's neck, he trotted towards us, but in a few yards dropped dead off his horse. I do not imagine that anybody except those in the front line of the 17th Lancers (13th Light Dragoons) saw what had happened.

We went on. When we got about two or three hundred yards the battery of the Russian Horse Artillery opened fire. I do not recollect hearing a word from anybody as we gradually broke from a trot to a canter, though the noise of the striking of men and horses by grape and round shot was deafening, while the dust and gravel struck up by the round shot that fell short was almost blinding, and irritated my horse so that I could scarcely hold him at all. But as we came nearer I could see plainly enough, especially when I was about a hundred yards from the guns.

I appeared to be riding straight on to the muzzle of one of the guns, and I distinctly saw the gunner apply his fuse. I shut my eyes then, for I thought that settled the question as far as I was concerned. But the shot just missed me and struck the man on my right full in the chest. In another minute I was on the gun and the leading Russian's grey horse, shot, I suppose, with a pistol by somebody on my right, fell across my horse, dragging it over with him and pinning me in between the gun and himself.

A Russian gunner on foot at once covered me with his carbine. He was just within reach of my sword, and I struck him across his neck. The blow did not do much harm, but it disconcerted his aim. At the same time a mounted gunner struck my horse on the forehead with his sabre. Spurring "Sir Briggs," he half jumped, half blundered, over the fallen horses and then for a short time bolted with me. I only remember finding myself alone among the Russians trying to get out as best I could. This, by some chance, I did, in spite of the attempts of the Russians to cut me down.

When clear again of the guns I saw two or three of my men making their way back, and as the fire from both flanks was still heavy it was a matter of running the gauntlet again. I have not sufficient recollection of minor incidents to describe them, as probably no two men who were in that charge would describe it in the same way.

When I was back pretty nearly where we started from I found that I was the senior officer of those not wounded, and, consequently, in command, there being two others, both junior to me, in the same position - Lieutenant Wombwell and Cornet Cleveland (afterwards killed at Inkerman). We remained formed up until the evening, when, as the enemy made no further attempt to advance, we returned to our tents, not very far off."

References

John W.H. Greeves, "A Horseman at War: An account of Captain the Hon. Godfrey Morgan (later Viscount Tredegar) and his charger Sir Briggs who took part in the Crimean War 1854 to 1855", Gwent local history: the journal of Gwent Local History Council, No. 68 (Spring 1990), p. 43-62. [Accessible online at The National Library of Wales: http://welshjournals.llgc.org.uk/browse/viewpage/llgc-id:1337678/llgc-id:1339018/llgc-id:1339063/get650.]

Fred. J. Harris, "Viscount Tredegar — Soldier, Peer, Public Benefactor and Humorist", Cardiff and Pontypridd Glamorgan County Times, 1908.[Reference in Greeves (1990); as yet unseen.]

Lord Tredegar, "Wit and Wisdom of Lord Tredegar", published Cardiff & London: Western Mail, 1911. [Republished online in 2012 as a Project Gutenberg EBook accessible here (www.gutenberg.org/files/39808/39808-h/39808-h.htm).]

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